PICTURES: Northern Lights spotted over Wirral and it could be visible for the next few weeks

Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell

On Wednesday night the Northern Lights put on a spectacular show across Wirral.

Stargazers were treated to a spectacular light display last night as the Northern Lights were visible across most parts of the region.

The amazing solar light show will still be able to be seen for the next few weeks in the North of England and could to be visible again further south on Merseyside at times.

The Met Office say that a combination between the direction of solar winds and the time of year means that the Northern Lights will be extra visible for a few weeks.

READ MORE: Merseyside could be treated to a view of the Northern Lights

Moreton Northern Lights. CREDIT: Tim Collins

Moreton Northern Lights. CREDIT: Tim Collins

Clear skies and heading to costal areas away from light pollution will give the best views of the stunning weather phenomena.

David Chennell took the following stunning pictures over Red Rocks, Holyake from around 8-10pm on Wednesday:

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Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell


Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell


Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell


Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell


Northern Lights over Hoylake - CREDIT: David Chennell

Northern Lights over Hoylake – CREDIT: David Chennell

A Met Office spokesman explained why the Northern Lights will be extra visible: “We are now in a period, lasting a few weeks, where these two factors are working together to increase the chances of geomagnetic disturbances, which in turn bring with them the aurora.

“The strength of the disturbance directly relates to how far south the aurora is visible, or how far north if you are in the southern hemisphere, and of course you need clear skies to see it.

They added: “The season of the year has an influence. The science behind this is not fully understood, but the two equinoctial periods in spring and autumn tend to produce an increase in aurora compared with winter and summer.”

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